Frontier Psychiatrist

Frontier Mixologist, Vol. 23: The Drunken Word

Posted on: October 1, 2010

It’s no secret that the editors of FP share a bit of a literary bent.  Fiction and cocktails share an affinity. Reading a good book with a drink at hand is a simple pleasure, and certain cocktails have become famous from their appearance in fiction.  Chief amongst being the Gimlet.  Although likely invented by British colonials and once popular “from Bombay down the Malabar coast to Colombo,” it makes its most famous appearance in Raymond Chandler’s ur-noir masterpiece The Long Goodbye.

 

Bogart as Marlowe in The Big Sleep

 

Hard-up detective Philip Marlowe drinks one on the suggestion of a rummy with scars all over his face named Terry Lennox.  Marlowe, sadly, does not show the attention to imbibing one might hope for, replying that he “was never fussy about drinks.”  Despite Marlowe’s indifference, the Gimlet took off, although it is best made with proportions different from those cited in the book, which call for one-to-one.

The Gimlet

2 oz. Plymouth gin

1/2 oz. Rose’s Lime Juice

dash of simple syrup

Combine all ingredients; shake with ice; strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

The specific ingredients are key here.  While another brand of gin may be substituted, please stick with gin, rather than going for the unremarkable vodka gimlets favored by the author of Julia and Julia.  As for the lime, it must be Rose’s lime juice.  But wait, isn’t fresh citrus juice a must?  It is, but Rose’s Lime Juice is not actually lime juice, but instead the modern iteration of what was once known as lime cordial.

Another cocktail made famous in fiction, this time of the spy rather than detective variety, is the Vesper. Ordered by James Bond in the first Bond novel, Casino Royale, the drink gave its name to Bond’s love interest Vesper Lynd.  Ms. Lynd was not long for this world, and upon her (inevitable) death, Commander Bond sensitively noted that “the bitch is dead now,” and made the switch to shaken vodka martinis. In the book, Ian Fleming actually has Bond recite the entire recipe.

The Vesper

3 oz. gin

1 oz. vodka

1/2 oz. Lillet (or Cocchi Americano if you can get it)

Stir all together in an iced mixing glass; strain into a chilled cocktail glass; garnish with lemon twist.

This one packs a lot of booze, and is a worthwhile twist on a classic martini.  To be sure, Commander Bond’s switch to vodka martinis was ill-advised.  If you get a bottle of the Lillet, it’s great just on its own with ice, too.

As opposed to cocktails in fiction, a discussion of fictional cocktails begins and ends with the undisputed greatest: the Flaming (Homer) Moe.  With Krusty-brand cough syrup as its secret ingredient, however, the Flaming Moe sounds suspiciously like purple drank, and should probably be avoided.

Drink up,

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Staff

L.V. Lopez, Publisher
Keith Meatto, Editor-In-Chief
Peter Lillis, Managing Editor
Freya Bellin
Andrew Hertzberg
Franklin Laviola
Gina Myers
Jared Thomas
Jordan Mainzer

Contributors

James Tadd Adcox
Michael Bakkensen
Sophie Barbasch
John Raymond Barker
Jeffery Berg
P.J. Bezanson
Lee Bob Black
Jessica Blank
Mark Blankenship
Micaela Blei
Amy Braunschweiger
Jeb Brown
Jamie Carr
Laura Carter
Damien Casten
Krissa Corbett Kavouras
Jillian Coneys
Jen Davis
Chris Dippel
Claire Dippel
Amy Elkins
Mike Errico
Alaina Ferris
Lucas Foglia
Fryd Frydendahl
Tyler Gilmore
Tiffany Hairston
Django Haskins
Todd Hido
Paul Houseman
Susan Hyon
Michael Itkoff
Eric Jensen
David S. Jung
Eric Katz
Will Kenton
Michael Kingsbaker
Steven Klein
Katie Kline
Anna Kushner
Jim Knable
Jess Lacher
Chris Landriau
Caitlin Leffel
David Levi
Daniel F. Levin
Carrie Levy
Jim Lillis
Sophie Lyvoff
Max Maddock
Bob McGrory
Chris Lillis Meatto
Mark Meatto
Kevin Mueller
Chris Q. Murphy
Gina Myers
Tim Myers
Alex Nackman
Michael Nicholoff
Elisabeth Nicholson
Nicole Pettigrew
Allyson Paty
Dana Perry
Jared R. Pike
Mayumi Shimose Poe
Marisa Ptak
Sarah Robbins
Anjoli Roy
Beeb Salzer
Terry Selucky
Serious Juice
David Skeist
Suzanne Farrell Smith
Amy Stein
Jay Tarbath
Christianne Tisdale
Phillip Toledano
Joe Trapasso
Sofie van Dam
Jeff Wilser
Susan Worsham
Khaliah Williams
David Wilson
James Yeh
Bernard Yenelouis
Wayan Zoey

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